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Imaging mass spectrometry in neuroscience.

Jörg Hanrieder (Institutionen för kemi- och bioteknik, Analytisk kemi) ; Nhu TN Phan ; Michael E. Kurczy (Institutionen för kemi- och bioteknik, Analytisk kemi) ; Andrew G Ewing (Institutionen för kemi och molekylärbiologi ; Institutionen för kemi- och bioteknik, Analytisk kemi)
ACS chemical neuroscience (1948-7193). Vol. 4 (2013), 5, p. 666-79.
[Artikel, refereegranskad vetenskaplig]

Imaging mass spectrometry is an emerging technique of great potential for investigating the chemical architecture in biological matrices. Although the potential for studying neurobiological systems is evident, the relevance of the technique for application in neuroscience is still in its infancy. In the present Review, a principal overview of the different approaches, including matrix assisted laser desorption ionization and secondary ion mass spectrometry, is provided with particular focus on their strengths and limitations for studying different neurochemical species in situ and in vitro. The potential of the various approaches is discussed based on both fundamental and biomedical neuroscience research. This Review aims to serve as a general guide to familiarize the neuroscience community and other biomedical researchers with the technique, highlighting its great potential and suitability for comprehensive and specific chemical imaging.

Nyckelord: Animals, Brain Chemistry, Humans, Mass Spectrometry, methods, Neurotransmitter Agents, analysis, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization, methods, Spectrometry, Mass, Secondary Ion, methods



Denna post skapades 2015-09-16. Senast ändrad 2015-12-21.
CPL Pubid: 222549

 

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Institutioner (Chalmers)

Institutionen för kemi- och bioteknik, Analytisk kemi (2006-2014)
Institutionen för kemi och molekylärbiologi (GU)

Ämnesområden

Kemi

Chalmers infrastruktur