CPL - Chalmers Publication Library
| Utbildning | Forskning | Styrkeområden | Om Chalmers | In English In English Ej inloggad.

Characterizing the Catecholamine Content of Single Mammalian Vesicles by Collision-Adsorption Events at an Electrode

Johan Dunevall (Institutionen för kemi och kemiteknik, Analytisk kemi) ; Hoda Mashadi Fathali (Institutionen för kemi och kemiteknik, Analytisk kemi) ; Neda Najafinobar (Institutionen för kemi och kemiteknik, Analytisk kemi) ; Jelena Lovric (Institutionen för kemi och kemiteknik, Analytisk kemi) ; Joakim Wigström (Institutionen för kemi och kemiteknik, Analytisk kemi) ; Ann-Sofie Cans (Institutionen för kemi och kemiteknik, Analytisk kemi) ; Andrew G Ewing (Institutionen för kemi och molekylärbiologi ; Institutionen för kemi och kemiteknik, Analytisk kemi)
Journal of the American Chemical Society (0002-7863). Vol. 137 (2015), 13, p. 4344-4346.
[Artikel, refereegranskad vetenskaplig]

We present the electrochemical response to single adrenal chromaffin vesicles filled with catecholamine hormones as they are adsorbed and rupture on a 33 mu m diameter disk-shaped carbon electrode. The vesicles adsorb onto the electrode surface and sequentially spread out over the electrode surface, trapping their contents against the electrode. These contents are then oxidized, and a current (or amperometric) peak results from each vesicle that bursts. A large number of current transients associated with rupture of single vesicles (86%) are observed under the experimental conditions used, allowing us to quantify the vesicular catecholamine content.



Denna post skapades 2015-05-12. Senast ändrad 2017-01-27.
CPL Pubid: 217018

 

Läs direkt!


Länk till annan sajt (kan kräva inloggning)


Institutioner (Chalmers)

Institutionen för kemi och kemiteknik, Analytisk kemi
Institutionen för kemi och molekylärbiologi (GU)

Ämnesområden

Kemi

Chalmers infrastruktur

Relaterade publikationer

Denna publikation ingår i:


New Electrochemical Tools to Study Exocytosis


PROBING SECRETORY VESICLES AND LIPOSOME MODEL SYSTEMS USING NANOSCALE ELECTROCHEMISTRY AND MASS SPECTROMETRY