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Chapter 7 Influence of fish consumption and some of its individual constituents on oxidative stress in cells, animals, and humans

Britt G. Gabrielsson (Institutionen för kemi- och bioteknik, Livsmedelsvetenskap) ; Niklas Andersson (Institutionen för kemi- och bioteknik, Livsmedelsvetenskap) ; Ingrid Undeland (Institutionen för kemi- och bioteknik, Livsmedelsvetenskap)
Antioxidants and Functional Components in Aquatic Foods. Hordur G. Kristinsson (Editor) p. 175-217. (2014)
[Kapitel]

Introduction Several clinical studies have shown that high consumption of fish is associated with lowered incidence of disease and consequently healthy aging. An increase in oxidative stress is suggested to be a common underlying mechanism of several non-communicable diseases such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and cancer. These diseases are typically associated with aging and the accumulation of oxidatively modified cellular components has been suggested to be a feature of the aging process itself. This chapter discusses the concept of oxidative stress in biochemical terms, as well as the underlying physiological mechanisms that are involved in the oxidative stress responses. Since oxidative stress is the net effect of several cellular events, one section addresses the most common methods used for analysis of oxidation products and antioxidants in plasma, urine, and tissues. The intention is summarize the current knowledge of fish consumption in relation to oxidative stress markers in humans and animals. In addition, studies in cells or animals that have investigated the effects of specific components found in fish, expected to affect oxidative stress negatively or positively, have also been included. These components include long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFA), environmental pollutants (heavy metals, Influence of fish consumption and some of its individual constituents on oxidative stress in cells, animals, and humans. In addition, studies in cells or animals that have investigated the effects of specific components found in fish, expected to affect oxidative stress negatively or positively, have also been included. These components include long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFA), environmental pollutants (heavy metals, dioxins, and polychlorinated biphenyls), and antioxidants/antioxidant-containing fish extracts. The chapter concludes with a discussion of some of the confounding factors that are likely to affect the outcome of studies dealing with oxidative stress.



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Denna post skapades 2014-12-04. Senast ändrad 2014-12-22.
CPL Pubid: 207292

 

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Institutioner (Chalmers)

Institutionen för kemi- och bioteknik, Livsmedelsvetenskap (2005-2014)

Ämnesområden

Livsvetenskaper
Hållbar utveckling
Innovation och entreprenörskap (nyttiggörande)
Toxikologi
Kardiovaskulär medicin
Näringslära

Chalmers infrastruktur