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Dielectric Properties of Transformer Oils for HVDC Applications

Lijun Yang ; Stanislaw Gubanski (Institutionen för material- och tillverkningsteknik, Högspänningsteknik) ; Yuriy Serdyuk (Institutionen för material- och tillverkningsteknik, Högspänningsteknik) ; Joachim Schiessling
IEEE Transactions on Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation (1070-9878). Vol. 19 (2012), 6, p. 1926-1933.
[Artikel, refereegranskad vetenskaplig]

The knowledge of the behavior of electric conductivity in mineral oils for possible applications in HVDC converter transformers is of paramount importance for proper design of their insulation system. This study presents the results of measurements of dielectric properties of various transformer oils by means of frequency response technique as well as time domain measurements, including measurements of ion mobility using the reversal polarity method. Influences imposed by varying the measurement voltage level and temperature are investigated. Some important parameters of the investigated oils, e. g. their conductivities, ion mobilities, ionic concentrations and effective ionic radiuses are compared and discussed. The results show that despite of similarities in various physical parameters of insulating mineral oils available on the market, the dielectric behavior and especially ionic conduction vary greatly between different oil types. Changes of these properties with temperature are characterized by different activation energies.

Nyckelord: HVDC converter transformer; transformer oil; dielectric properties; ion mobility



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Denna post skapades 2012-11-28. Senast ändrad 2017-10-03.
CPL Pubid: 166718

 

Institutioner (Chalmers)

Institutionen för material- och tillverkningsteknik, Högspänningsteknik (2005-2017)

Ämnesområden

Energi
Materialvetenskap
Hållbar utveckling
Elektroteknik
Elkraftteknik

Chalmers infrastruktur